I rate you. You rate me. Should we do so publicly?

We find that ratings are not absolute, but rather depend on whether they are given anonymously or under one’s own name and whether they are displayed publicly or held confidentially. The potential to reciprocate produces higher and more correlated ratings than when individuals are unable to see how others rated them. Ratings further depend on the gender and nationalities of the raters and ratees. All of these findings indicate that ratings should not be taken at face value without considering social nuances.
Date: June 22, 2010
Book Title: Proc. of the 3rd Workshop on Online Social Networks (WOSN 2010)
Type: InProceedings
Downloads: 258

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Bibtex


@InProceedings{I_rate_you_You_rate_me_Should_we_do_so_p,
  author = "Chun-Yuen Teng and Debra Lauterbach and Lada Adamic",
  title = "{I rate you. You rate me. Should we do so publicly?}",
  month = "June",
  year = "2010",
  booktitle = "Proc. of the 3rd Workshop on Online Social Networks (WOSN 2010)",
}